Product evaluation - OECD: final step in the validation process of a new alternative method

In 2012, the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) gave its technical approval to an alternative method to animal testing, in partnership with L'Oréal. Another look at a key breakthrough.

Evaluation des produits

L’Oréal has developed an alternative method based on the exposure of eggs and fish early life stage to the substance being tested in order to evaluate the toxicity of a product.

Evaluation des produits

L’Oréal has developed an alternative method based on the exposure of eggs and fish early life stage to the substance being tested in order to evaluate the toxicity of a product.

In 2012, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) technically approved an alternative testing method developed in partnership with L’Oréal. For over twenty years, the Group has been committed to designing alternatives to animal testing to evaluate the safety of its products and ingredients. The method is based on the exposure of eggs and fish early life stage to the substance in order to evaluate the possible toxicity of rinse-out products such as shampoo, hair dyes and conditioners. This approval constitutes the conclusion of a project started nearly a decade ago with working parties from the OECD and the Health and Environment Science Institute (HESI), which are dedicated to finding alternative testing methods and which bring together the expertise of industrials (including L’Oréal), academics and authorities. The OECD is the reference international body for these evaluation methods and its approval represents an important step for L’Oréal. Once approved, it will have to be integrated into national and international regulatory texts. L’Oréal, which has already made a major contribution to the development of most of the alternative solutions currently approved in the cosmetics sector, is continuing its research into the performance of these tests. In November 2012, its joint research project with the University of Leipzig was recognised by the European Partnership for Alternative Approaches to Animal Testing (EPAA).